THE ART BUZZ MAY 2015

Albuquerque

Palette Contemporary Art & Craft holds an open house May 15 for Barbara Gilhooly and Ayn Hanna’s A Stitch in Time and Wired Line with both artists attending. Hanna and Gilhooly developed a love of line and rich surface texture and cultivated it through their collective background of drawing and printmaking. In these works, they explore their attraction to geometry and texture in various media. Hanna creates textile paintings with layers of fabric combined with thread “drawing” to create texture and line. Most of Gilhooly’s work is rendered on wood or constructed out of wood or wire. Her paintings contain many paint layers and carved surfaces. The exhibit will remain in the gallery through June 22. Visit palettecontemporary.com.

10th biennial Albuquerque Fiber Arts Fiesta is May 21 through 23 at Expo NM’s Manuel Lujan complex. This event features a wide array of fiber arts exhibits, classes, fashion shows, vendors and special events. Judith Roderick, artist, silk painter and quilter, is the featured artist of the Fiesta and will showcase her incredible quilts. The Fiesta is open Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More information at abqfiberartscouncil.org.

Art in the Park returns for another year of outdoor sumertime art fairs held on Sundays in the shady La Entrada Park in the heart of Corrales. Outstanding juried art and fine crafts are featured. Dates for this year’s fairs are June 7, August 2, September 6 and October 4. Award-winning artists show a wide range of art and fine crafts, including paintings, photography, fiber art, fused and stained glass work, jewelry, ceramics, wood carving, printmaking, sculpture, silk painting and woodwork. Roving accoustical musicians entertain visitors in the morning and amplified bands perform in the bandshell in the afternoon. Admission and parking are free, with food, drink, entertainment and art activities for children. Head to nmartistsmarket.org for details.

 

Santa Fe

New Language, New Vistas: Women Artists of New Mexico features historic women artists of New Mexico, May 8 through 31 at Matthews Gallery. At the beginning of the 20th century, the isolated Santa Fe and Taos art colonies offered a fresh start for female artists who had struggled to find recognition back East. The Southwestern art community became a vanguard for women seeking a voice—a “new language.” The show includes Dorothy Brett, Doris Cross, Janet Lippincott, Beatrice Mandelman, Agnes Sims and other artists who shaped New Mexico art history. “The Southwest gave me a whole new language, new vistas to paint,” said Henriette Wyeth, who moved to Taos in 1939. The exhibition tells the story of these bold artistic pioneers and their battle to reach new heights in American art. “For all the social freedom these women found in the Southwest, it was still a struggle,” says gallery owner Lawrence Matthews. “Many of them worked odd jobs to subsidize the groundbreaking artwork they were creating. They deserve chapters in the art history books, and that’s the conversation we’re carrying forward.”

The family-owned gallery of renowned contemporary artist Dan Namingha marks 25 years in business on May 1. The occasion will be commemorated with an exhibition featuring the work of Namingha and his two sons, Arlo and Michael. Celebrating 25 Years on Lincoln Avenue: New Directions opens with a 5:30 to 7:30 reception Friday, May 22. The exhibit will remain on display through June 12. Known for colorful abstract and representative imagery of his beloved childhood home at Second Mesa on the Hopi Reservation, Dan Namingha has explored the symbols and landscapes of his Hopi Tewa heritage in media including acrylics, pastels and watercolors, as well as bronze, wood and stone sculpture. By 1990, Namingha was already a well established artist who had exhibited his work in Austria, Germany and France and at numerous American embassies around the world, as well as at prestigious museums and galleries throughout the United States. Niman Fine Art was one of the first art galleries owned and operated by Native Americans in the United States. Today the gallery shows the work of Dan, Arlo and Michael Namingha. Frances Namingha and Nicole Namingha manage the gallery. Dan Namingha’s work is also familiar to many Santa Feans and tourists; 2015 marks the fourth consecutive year he has been commissioned to create the artwork for the annual Santa Fe Opera poster. He is also creating the artwork for the 2015 Santa Fe Wine & Chile Festival.

An official welcome to Candice Hopkins (Tlingit), who has joined the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts as chief curator after serving as interim chief curator for the past year. Her first major show at MoCNA, An Evening Redness in the West, opens in August. Hopkins is a curator and writer who has held curatorial positions at the National Gallery of Canada, Western Front and the Walter Phillips Gallery at The Banff Centre. Hopkins holds an MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, where she was awarded the Ramapo Curatorial Prize for the exhibition Every Stone Tells a Story: The Performance Work of David Hammons and Jimmie Durham. Her writings on history, art and vernacular architecture have been published by MIT Press, BlackDog Publishing, Revolver Press, New York University, Fillip and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others.

Join the School for Advanced Research for a May 21 public lecture, reception, and open studio for 2015 Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Artist Fellow Dawn Dark Mountain. As a member of the Turtle Clan of the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois, Dark Mountain uses her watercolors and woodcuts to connect traditional and present-day woodland ideas, philosophies and stories. Since arriving at SAR, she has been working on a series of paintings and prints inspired by the Treaty of Canandaigua of 1794. In recognition of the friendship and rights of the Six Nations, in 1794 the United States pledged an annual payment of trade goods including calico cloth to the Iroquois Nations. This payment continues to this day. The May 21 event concludes with a visit to the Dubin Studio to see Dark Mountain’s work.RSVP to505.954.7205 by May 18.

Taos

The summer season of arts and crafts fairs in Kit Carson Park commences with the Taos County Chamber of Commerce’s44th annual Spring Arts & Crafts Fair, May 8 through 10, and continues Memorial Day weekend and monthly after that, culminating with the annual Wool Festival Weekend Arts & Crafts Fair October 2 through 4. Check taos.org for complete details on each month’s fair, date and time. If you ever need a reason to head to Taos, let one of these weekend fairs be it!

 


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