Still Hungry? April 2017

Like homesteading itself (timeless, creative, sustainable), many of our homesteading stories of yore haven’t lost their inspiration or relevance, and the folks who graced the cover shots haven’t lost their touch. If you’ve yet to check out our past homesteading stories (visit localflavormagazine.com), we suggest you meet jewelers Marian Denipah and Steve LaRance in last year’s “Working with the Earth”; homesteader, mother, blogger extraordinaire Erin O’Neill in “A Life Home Grown,” 2015; and sustainable inspiration and Ampersand Sustainable Learning Director Amanda Bramble of “In Harmony,” 2012, our very first homestead issue.

The inherently fresh and forward-looking feel of springtime, new growth, longer days becomes yet more personal, down-to-earth and magical when you meet the folks who have their hands in this local soil—metaphorically or literally—creating, reviving and gleaning its bounty. We asked Erin, Amanda and Steve for their takes on “down-home” recipes, and in return, they shared with us tastes of themselves, this earth, and simply some delicious down-homestead goodness.

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Still Hungry? Tradition, Passion, Love – November 2015

The holiday season, of course, is centered largely around food. November through January often mean full bellies and lots of travel, and that heaping combination often means hotels, hot meals and hospitality. For this month of gratitude and lots of food, Still Hungry? talks with the local chefs who work in some of Santa Fe’s best hotel restaurants and dedicate themselves year-round to feeding people who are away from home—and locals, too!

Whether you’re on the road for business, vacationing for the holidays, or you live in Santa Fe and don’t feel up to cooking, these chefs are there to feed and nurture you with a meal that tastes of his own traditions. And whether you’re staying in the hotel, or you’re just out for a local bite, you won’t even have to do the dishes. Continue reading

Chef Perno’s French Green Lentil Salad with Winter Squash

PernoBoys2

Chef Jonathan Perno grew up in New Mexico in a household that had a “lot of traditional New Mexico food, especially around the holidays.” Meals were always at the table and the food was the focal point. “We were always excited when she made cakes,” Chef Jonathan says of his mother. He and his brothers would crowd into the kitchen to see who got the beaters, the spoon and the bowl to lick clean. Continue reading

Calabacitas Con Carne

AutumnSquash

By Photo by M.Rehemtulla [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From Arlene Wagner of Wagner Farms

1 1/2 pounds beef steak, cubed
2 Tablespoons shortening1/2 cup water
2 cups fresh corn cut from cob
3 medium zuchini, diced
2 medium summer squash, diced
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 cup chopped green chile
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup grated Monterrey Jack cheese

Brown beef in shortening in a large skillet at medium-high heat. Lower heat and add water to beef. Cover and simmer at low heat until tender. Add more water if needed. Add remaining ingredients, except cheese, to beef and cook at medium heat until squash is tender. Add cheese, stir lightly and enjoy!

Wagner Farms is located at 5000 Corrales Road in Corrales. 505.459.0719, wagnerfarmscorrales.com.

Pappardelle with Squash Blossoms, Broccoli, Basil and Goat Milk Brie

pappardelle

Douglas Merriam

The following recipe is by Chef Matt Yohalem of Il Piatto Farmhouse Kitchen in Santa Fe, and is featured in the June 2014, Farm and Ranch issue. It’s best enjoyed with fresh, locally grown ingredients.

To make the pesto:

1 cup first basil

1 Tablespoon pine nuts, lightly toasted

½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Zest of one lemon

½ Tablespoon roughly chopped green garlic clove

1 Tablespoon chopped parsley

Pulse all ingredients in a Cuisinart until chunky but consistent. Set aside at room temperature.

To make the pasta dough:

1 pound all-purpose flour

4 eggs

1 pinch salt

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Water as needed Continue reading