Still Hungry? October 2017

Chef Jonathan in Los Poblanos field

Chef Jonathan in Los Poblanos field

With autumn in full swing and its chile-scented chill in the air, our palates welcome the warmth of spices just as our bellies make room for heartier dishes. And as the days grow shorter—even while the workday does not!—we hunt for good reasons to toast and sip a fine glass of wine at the end of the day. So this month, we have indeed not just one good reason to toast, but three great excuses to say three cheers—and three delicious recipes, to boot. These three Duke City staples hold the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence. This particular award, in the words of winespectator.com, is given to those establishments that “offer at least 90 selections, feature a well-chosen assortment of quality producers, along with a thematic match to the menu in both price and style. Whether compact or extensive, focused or diverse, these lists deliver sufficient choice to satisfy discerning wine lovers.”

We asked each of them to share a recipe and wine pairing of their choice…and in return we received three excellent wines to enjoy alongside delicious dishes that incorporate the warmth and spice of autumn. Thank you, Ranchers Club of New Mexico, Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm (Campo, their new restaurant, opens this month!), and Bien Shur at Sandia Resort and Casino for giving us a reason to eat out—and now, cook in—drink up and say cheers. We know you’ll enjoy Campo Chef Jonathan Perno’s squash soup with spicy pepitas, and two different takes on Moroccan lamb—Ranchers Club Chef Christopher Galle’s chops with gremolata sauce, and Bien Shur Chef Martin Torrez’s spiced rack with mint chimichurri—and of course, three very different, very excellent wines.

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Still Hungry? – November 2016

It’s the season for giving thanks, and in the fading light of autumn we—like the sky, which opens in the void left by fallen leaves—begin to turn inward, finding more space in ourselves. Of course, for some, what this really means is making more space in our bellies for Thanksgiving dinner… So this month at Local Flavor, we’re making room at our table (and in our stomachs) for the rich cornucopia of local tradition, culture, and this high-desert earth’s vast yield. From traditional Pueblo fare, straight from the land, to New Mexico’s Spanish heritage, to a beloved local chef’s native Swahili cuisine, to food that even, and especially, children can concoct, there’s a place at our table for everyone—and we hope you’ll join us.

Green Chile Stew

Excerpted from The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: The Traditional Cooking of New Mexico 50th Anniversary Edition by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison Continue reading

Still Hungry? December 2015

Plucked from the pages of the local cookbooks we are featuring this month in “Gifts for the Home Cook,” here are four great recipes that will bring a little local flavor to your holiday table.

For the holidays, I have a few traditions I share with my family. We always have breakfast together after everyone gets in, and this year, I’m making everyone these Southwestern-style pancakes from Sharon Niederman’s gem, The New Mexico Farm Table Cookbook.

Toasted Pinon-Dusted Blue Corn Pancakes

Serves 4

This is a Sunday morning brunch treat that my family serves with bacon and chokecherry syrup that we make from chokecherries we forage in Cimarron Canyon each August. This recipe is good with honey butter.

1 ½ cups finely ground atole (toasted blue cornmeal) preferably horno roasted
¼ cup all purpose or whole wheat flour
¼ teaspoon salt
1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ cup toasted ground piñon nuts, divided
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 ½ cups buttermilk or a combination of whole milk, yogurt, or unsweetened soy or coconut milk
¼ cup vegetable oil (not olive oil)
Honey butter, for serving (optional)
Chokeberry syrup, local honey, or pure maple syrup, for serving

Heat a griddle, preferably cast iron

Place the dry ingredients in a large bowl, including ¼ cup of the piñons. In another bowl, combine the eggs, buttermilk, and oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Stir quickly, just enough to mix. Spoon the pancakes onto the hot griddle, using 2 large tablespoons of batter per pancake. When the edges start to bubble, flip once with a spatula. Serve hot with honey butter, if desired, and chokecherry syrup, local honey, or real maple syrup, sprinkled with the reserved ¼ cup of toasted piñons.

Niederman, Sharon. The New Mexico Farm Table Cookbook: 100 Homegrown Recipes from the Land of Enchantment (The Farm Table Cookbook). The Countryman Press, 2015.

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Juniper Lamb Stew

By Dcrjsr (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Dcrjsr (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From Chef Michael Giese of The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

2 pounds lamb meat, cubed
3 cups fresh corn cut from the cob
6 green onions
3 bell peppers
1 Tablespoon flour
2 Tablespoons lard
1/2 cup celery leaves (no stalks)
1/4 cup juniper berries
2 Tablespoons chile powder
6 cups water
salt to taste Continue reading

Roast Leg of Lamb with Mint Sauce

Roast Leg of Lamb

5-6 pounds boneless leg of lamb, trimmed and tied

3 Tablespoons garlic, chopped

1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped

2 Tablespoons butter

Salt and pepper

Crush the garlic and rosemary with a mortar and pestle (or food

processor), add 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Butter and mash

into a paste. Rub over the lamb and let it sit for about 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450°. Place lamb in a large roasting pan and roast until the internal temperature is somewhere around 140°, depending on your preference. This takes about 1 1/2 hours. Remove lamb from oven, cover tightly with foil and allow to rest for a few minutes. If you like, add some potatoes to the roasting pan after rubbing with olive oil and salt. They will be delicious!

Says Beth Koch, owner of Zia Diner in Santa Fe: “My mother would have steamed artichokes and served them simply with melted butter and garlic, with a bit of lemon rind grated into the butter. I think an artichoke, like a Brussels sprout, is even more wonderful when grilled or roasted, and so I would serve the lamb with grilled artichokes. They can be served with a simple aioli or Green Goddess dressing, but at home I still prefer melted butter with garlic and lemon.

When we were very young, my mother just used mint jelly with the lamb. We loved it! As we grew older, she introduced a more sophisticated variation, an English mint sauce that had lots of vinegar. I think the vinegar was meant to cut the richness of the meat, but it was never quite sweet enough for us kids. Fresh herbs were not so available commercially when I was a kid, but now it is really simple to make mint sauce from scratch, and to taste.”

Mint Sauce

Bunch of fresh mint, finely chopped

3-4 Tablespoons boiling water

2 Tablespoons white wine vinegar

2 Tablespoons sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients and let sit for an hour or so before serving with the lamb. Add more or less sugar, depending on your personal preference.

Recipe by Beth Draiscoll of the Zia Diner, recipe appears in May 2014 Local Flavor