Still Hungry? – November 2016

It’s the season for giving thanks, and in the fading light of autumn we—like the sky, which opens in the void left by fallen leaves—begin to turn inward, finding more space in ourselves. Of course, for some, what this really means is making more space in our bellies for Thanksgiving dinner… So this month at Local Flavor, we’re making room at our table (and in our stomachs) for the rich cornucopia of local tradition, culture, and this high-desert earth’s vast yield. From traditional Pueblo fare, straight from the land, to New Mexico’s Spanish heritage, to a beloved local chef’s native Swahili cuisine, to food that even, and especially, children can concoct, there’s a place at our table for everyone—and we hope you’ll join us.

Green Chile Stew

Excerpted from The Rancho de Chimayó Cookbook: The Traditional Cooking of New Mexico 50th Anniversary Edition by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison Continue reading

Still Hungry? December 2015

Plucked from the pages of the local cookbooks we are featuring this month in “Gifts for the Home Cook,” here are four great recipes that will bring a little local flavor to your holiday table.

For the holidays, I have a few traditions I share with my family. We always have breakfast together after everyone gets in, and this year, I’m making everyone these Southwestern-style pancakes from Sharon Niederman’s gem, The New Mexico Farm Table Cookbook.

Toasted Pinon-Dusted Blue Corn Pancakes

Serves 4

This is a Sunday morning brunch treat that my family serves with bacon and chokecherry syrup that we make from chokecherries we forage in Cimarron Canyon each August. This recipe is good with honey butter.

1 ½ cups finely ground atole (toasted blue cornmeal) preferably horno roasted
¼ cup all purpose or whole wheat flour
¼ teaspoon salt
1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ cup toasted ground piñon nuts, divided
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 ½ cups buttermilk or a combination of whole milk, yogurt, or unsweetened soy or coconut milk
¼ cup vegetable oil (not olive oil)
Honey butter, for serving (optional)
Chokeberry syrup, local honey, or pure maple syrup, for serving

Heat a griddle, preferably cast iron

Place the dry ingredients in a large bowl, including ¼ cup of the piñons. In another bowl, combine the eggs, buttermilk, and oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Stir quickly, just enough to mix. Spoon the pancakes onto the hot griddle, using 2 large tablespoons of batter per pancake. When the edges start to bubble, flip once with a spatula. Serve hot with honey butter, if desired, and chokecherry syrup, local honey, or real maple syrup, sprinkled with the reserved ¼ cup of toasted piñons.

Niederman, Sharon. The New Mexico Farm Table Cookbook: 100 Homegrown Recipes from the Land of Enchantment (The Farm Table Cookbook). The Countryman Press, 2015.

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Chicos

chicos recipe

photo: Gaelen Casey

Chicos
recipe from Tasting New Mexico: 100 Years of Distinctive Home Cooking by Cheryl Jamison
Usually made with young “green” field corn, chicos are typically slow-roasted in outdoor horno ovens and then dried on rooftops. Farmers start a wood fire in the horno, and when the oven walls reach the right temperature, they rake out the embers with a hoe, place moistened corn in its husks inside, seal the door and vent hole, and leave the corn to roast overnight. Continue reading

Fresh Goat Cheese with Green Chile Chutney

Fresh Goat Cheese with Green Chile Chutney
from Tasting New Mexico: 100 Years of Distinctive Home Cooking by Cheryl Jamison
This chutney evolved from a recipe in Lucy Delgado’s important 1979 book Comidas de New Mexico. She like the relish, as she called it, with hamburgers, hot dogs, and meat loaf, but it also makes a splendid accompaniment to the simple cheeses once made regularly at home.

Serves 6 or more

Green Chile Chutney
¾ cup cider or white vinegar
¾ cup sugar
½ medium onion, minced
½ teaspoon yellow mustard seed
¼ teaspoon salt Continue reading

Roque’s Beef Carnitas

beeffrom Tasting New Mexico: 100 Years of Distinctive Home Cooking by Cheryl & Bill Jamison

Pork is the most common meat for carnitas in New Mexico and the rest of the borderlands, but many cooks also make a stellar rendition with beef. This is the popular version that Roque Garcia and his wife, Mona Cavalli, have served for decades from their street cart on the Santa Fe Plaza. The couple credits Roque’s mother for the original home recipe, which Roque recommends duplicating in other home kitchens in the following manner. He calls for an overnight marinating for the meat, but we have had good results with as little as a half-hour soak when rushed.
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