Still Hungry? July 2017: Recipes from The Teahouse

Whether you’re tucking in under a broad umbrella for a midday respite from the sun, or chasing the last rays as the sky turns pink and the temperature drops, summer makes for prime patio season. We’re not the only ones charmed by the outdoor tables at The Teahouse—the patio was part of what drew Owner Richard Freedman to buy the place four-and-a-half years ago. Located on Canyon Road, and nestled beneath the bustle of summertime art-district traffic, The Teahouse is perfectly situated for a relaxing pause between gallery visits. And its beautiful outdoor dining space, nestled among the shade of 70-year-old apricot, apple and pear trees, is reminiscent of plein-air settings in Provence and Tuscany.

As it happened, Richard lined the menu with favorites he learned to cook in Italy: lasagna Bolognese and an Italian chicken pot pie with polenta and parmesan, even affogato, a classic Italian dessert of espresso poured over vanilla ice cream. What his dishes share is an affinity for simple food. “The Italians have such a gift for combinations of flavors,” Richard says. “Classic Italian combinations really work, and you don’t want to do a lot to them because the basic ingredients are so good.” The dishes, of course, are also perfect companions to an al fresco dining experience on the patio. Continue reading

Still Hungry? June 2017

Photo-Credit_Douglas-Merriam Harsh and frigid, scalding and cracked, ancient with fossils of the inland sea that once was, and fresh with shoots that somehow rise from the earth’s snow-quenched crevices. The sky is huge and open enough to cradle both the bright, searing sun and the drenching monsoons and billows of snow that stumble in, early or late, never apologetic, each summer and winter season. Soft from afar, jagged up close; seemingly dead as a fossil, crystalized—but, just there, a fragile shoot. Part of the magic, the miracle of this place, the high desert, is the paradox of, the contrast between, the aliveness that bursts through what seems to be the uncaring, solid stillness of earth.

And then there are the people who cultivate this earth’s soil. All year at the Santa Fe Farmers Market, these men and women from their various plots of Northern New Mexico land sell the creations they’ve nurtured with their own hands. “Life for such a creation in northern New Mexico is unlike anywhere in the world,” writes Lesley S. King in photographer Douglas Merriam’s 2016 cookbook—a book born of, inspired by and in ode to the Santa Fe Farmers Market. The book, A Farm Fresh Journey Santa Fe Farmers Market Cookbook, is a gorgeous testament to the stark beauty of New Mexico as well as to Doug’s artistic talent, his ability to capture the earth, its fruit, its people. It’s the portrait of the contrast to and relationship between the New Mexico landscape, the plants that grow from it, and the people who cultivate and make these delicacies thrive. Ultimately, it’s a taste of our local earth. Continue reading

Still Hungry? August 2016

It’s late July as I write this, and my goodness is it hot. The apricot tree in our yard rains down big, juicy apricots, but the water that usually blesses our parched earth at this time of year has yet to roll in on the billowing back of dark clouds and thunder. And our sunflowers droop their wilty golden heads come late afternoon. Yet somehow, come drought or downpour, our local chefs are endowed with the gift of creating the delicious out of even the most dire. Such is the magic of desert-inspired cooking.

This month, Still Hungry? brings you two of our very talented chefs, who are also intimately familiar with this local soil and all it yields—or doesn’t—as their dishes are brought straight from the earth to the plate. Chef Carrie Eagle of Farm and Table tells us that this year, in this heat and drought, produce is struggling in the dry earth, but the onions are prolific. And inspired by that bounty, she’s shared with us her Sol Harvest Farm French onion soup.

Chef Jonathan Perno of La Merienda at Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm brings us a decadent breakfast to be enjoyed in the cool of the early desert-morning air. His blue-corn yogurt pancakes are rich and delicious—and especially delightful when topped with local stone fruit, which has been so bountiful this summer. We hope you enjoy these farm-created dishes as much as we do, for their ingredients reveal our earth’s local gifts. Continue reading

Savory Baked Apples with Green Chile

By Hansueli Krapf         This file was uploaded with Commonist. [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Hansueli Krapf This file was uploaded with Commonist. [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From Chef Jonathan Perno of Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm

4 Arkansas Black apples*, cored
1 cup water
1/4 teaspoon fresh-grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 to 1/2 cup green chile, finely chopped1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup toasted pecans, chopped

Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees. Wash and core the apples. Set them aside. In a mixing bowl, add the water, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger, allspice and maple syrup. Mix until combined. Place the apples in a basking dish with room to spare. Pour the liquid mixture over the apples. In a separate bowl, mix together the green chile, the pecans and half the butter. Stuff the apples with this mixture. Divide the remaining butter into small pieces and place them around the pan. Cover the pan with foil and bake for 45 to 60 minutes.

Check the apples with a skewer; if the skewer is removed easily, then remove the apples from the oven and allow them to cool.

Serves 4

*The Arkansas Black is a medium-size apple good for long storage (up to six months). It has thick dark skin and flesh that is tart, sweet and very juicy. Can’t find Arkansas Black apples? You can substitute Rome, Pink Lady, Jonathan or Granny Smith.

Los Poblanos is located at 4803 Rio Grande Blvd NW in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque. 505.344.9297, lospoblanos.com

La Espolóna Margarita

la espolona grapefruit margaritafrom El Pinto

“A refreshing twist on a traditional margarita is the La Espolóna, a refreshing cocktail made with fresh and sweet ruby red grapefruit, simple syrup and Espolón Silver Tequila. Beware: When this drink is made properly, you may not notice the tequila but only the sweet refreshing nature of the grapefruit. And if you are not a grapefruit lover, you may become one after a couple La Espolónas.” —Douglas Evilsizor, El Pinto

12 oz fresh squeezed ruby red grapefruit
1.5 oz Espolón tequila
1.5 oz simple syrup
splash fresh lime juice

Serve in an 18 oz Tom Collins or highball glass. Garnish with a large circular wedge of grapefruit.

El Pinto, 10500 4th St NW, Albuquerque, 505.898.1771, elpinto.com.