Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict

Serves 4

With Mother’s Day brunch in mind, Beth Draiscoll offers a Zia Diner staple, their Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict. “We smoke whole sides of salmon here at the Zia,” she says, “but I think good commercial lox is also just fine.” Beth notes that at the Zia, “We use the iconic blender Hollandaise first made famous by Julia Child. It holds fairly well and doesn’t ‘break’ as some recipes tend to do.”

To prepare the hollandaise sauce:

3 egg yolks

2 Tablespoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon salt

Pinch of cayenne

Pinch of black pepper

1/4 pound butter (1 stick), melted and warm

Whisk the egg yolks, lemon juice, salt, cayenne and black pepper in blender. With blender running, slowly drizzle in melted butter and mix until sauce comes together and thickens.

To put it all together:

8 English muffins

8 eggs (two per serving)

1 ounce Nova lox

Sprig of dill or Italian parsley

Poach eggs and rest on paper towels while toasting English muffins. Place Nova lox on each toasted muffin, top with a poached egg and pour some Hollandaise over each. Garnish with a sprig of dill or chopped Italian parsley and serve immediately.

Recipe by Beth Draiscoll of the Zia Diner; recipe appears in May 2014 Local Flavor

What Brings Us Together?

When Santa Fe native Nancy Abruzzo met her future husband Richard, a renowned balloonist from Albuquerque, she was a total novice in that world. But she was also game and she was adventurous. Richard’s passion for balloons, both gas and hot air, was contagious, and Nancy found herself not only becoming an aficionado but, eventually, a pilot, herself. The son of world-famous balloonist Ben Abruzzo who founded the Albuquerque Balloon Museum, Richard had won countless awards, capped in 2004 by the Gordon Bennett Cup, a prestigious international contest he won with co-pilot Carol Rymer Davis for long distance gas ballooning.

Courtesy Nancy Abruzzo

Courtesy Nancy Abruzzo

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Savory Baked Apples with Green Chile

By Hansueli Krapf         This file was uploaded with Commonist. [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Hansueli Krapf This file was uploaded with Commonist. [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From Chef Jonathan Perno of Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm

4 Arkansas Black apples*, cored
1 cup water
1/4 teaspoon fresh-grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 to 1/2 cup green chile, finely chopped1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup toasted pecans, chopped

Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees. Wash and core the apples. Set them aside. In a mixing bowl, add the water, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger, allspice and maple syrup. Mix until combined. Place the apples in a basking dish with room to spare. Pour the liquid mixture over the apples. In a separate bowl, mix together the green chile, the pecans and half the butter. Stuff the apples with this mixture. Divide the remaining butter into small pieces and place them around the pan. Cover the pan with foil and bake for 45 to 60 minutes.

Check the apples with a skewer; if the skewer is removed easily, then remove the apples from the oven and allow them to cool.

Serves 4

*The Arkansas Black is a medium-size apple good for long storage (up to six months). It has thick dark skin and flesh that is tart, sweet and very juicy. Can’t find Arkansas Black apples? You can substitute Rome, Pink Lady, Jonathan or Granny Smith.

Los Poblanos is located at 4803 Rio Grande Blvd NW in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque. 505.344.9297, lospoblanos.com

Chef Johnny Vee Wants to Know

Fire & Hops

slider Fire and Hops

As a longtime fan of Chef Joel Coleman’s cooking, I remember my disappointment when I heard he was leaving town after running into owner problems at his downtown venture Koi. Prior to that, Coleman had made a splash with Mauka in the Guadalupe district, serving his unique spin on Japanese and Asian inspired cooking. His frustration is one that many talented chefs feel; finding your culinary footing in this fickle industry can be tricky. I was glad to hear he was back in town and eager to check out his new gastro pub, an idea he had been playing with in his head for years. As I wrote in my round-up in the September issue of Local Flavor, when I visit a restaurant three times in a week, you know I’m intrigued. Fire & Hops has become my new “local favorite” so I was curious to hear from the chef himself, and partner Josh Johns, just how this new gamble is panning out … and to talk Spam. Continue reading

Albuquerque: The Frontier of Beer

Il Vicino

When I began this story, I set out to visit all the Albuquerque breweries. “No problem,” I thought, “it’ll only take me a few days!” Little did I realize that the number of establishments crafting locally produced, small-batch beers has positively skyrocketed in the past few years and Albuquerque is now home to some 25 or 30 microbreweries. Simply put, Albuquerque craft beer is exploding. But what’s behind this brewery boom? Continue reading

The Buzz October 2014

Albuquerque

According to Women’s Health magazine, Albuquerque is one of the country’s “up-and-coming” food scenes. To which we shout a resounding, duh! According to the magazine’s formula of searching for highly rated eateries, three Duke City restaurants were highlighted, all featuring creative Latin cuisine: Pollito Con Papas, Guava Tree Cafe and Pasión Latin Fusion. Kudos all around! Continue reading