A Tale of Two Bakeries

If you suddenly find yourself hungry when you’re in the south end of Santa Fe’s South Capitol district, there’s a good reason for it. That fragrant aroma of baking baguettes, croissants, pastries, muffins and more wafting through the air comes from two beloved Santa Fe restaurants that are new to...

Breaking New Ground: CCA and SITE Santa Fe

Two venues historically devoted to the contemporary side of the arts in Santa Fe are building on their reputations—artistically, and literally—with forward-looking exhibitions and additions to some already impressive innovations.

Still Hungry? July 2017: Recipes from The Teahouse

Whether you’re tucking in under a broad umbrella for a midday respite from the sun, or chasing the last rays as the sky turns pink and the temperature drops, summer makes for prime patio season. We’re not the only ones charmed by the outdoor tables at The Teahouse—the patio was...

Balanced Beer, Balanced Life – Kaktus Brewing, Albuquerque

Pulling into Kaktus Brewing Co. feels like pulling up to a friend’s house, where the only plans for the evening are catching up over a beer on the back porch. Wedged between the susurrus of commuter traffic on I-25 and the Rio Grande in Bernalillo, the locale is bordered by...

Georgia O’Keeffe: A Woman Ahead of Her Time

While out to lunch with some local folks recently, I mentioned the 20th anniversary of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. To a person, each of my companions was astounded that only 20 years had gone by since the museum’s opening in July of 1997—everyone felt this most-visited Santa Fe Museum had...

The (R)Evolution of Steve Jobs at Santa Fe Opera

At 420 years old, opera is a venerable art form: The first recorded opera was Jacopo Peri’s Dafne, which premiered in Florence, Italy, in 1597. But opera also is ever young. New works are written and regularly performed today, and greeted with much applause by audiences. That’s certainly long been...

The Force of George RR Martin

Back in 1979, when George R.R. Martin first arrived in Santa Fe, both he and his newly adopted city were relative unknowns outside of their respective genres: GRRM’s fantasy, horror and sci-fi; Santa Fe’s the visual arts market. But for this already-successful writer of novels and TV shows, the world...

Fishing Report – July 2017 – Away from the Crowd in Taos Area

Many of New Mexico’s best waters surround Taos. The Rio Grande and Red Rivers are the best known but there are a few other streams worth fishing–and they sometime fish better then those big waters. Fishing pressure is a big factor on fishing anywhere but especially on smaller streams because...

The Buzz: July 2017

What's in, what's out, what's hot, what's not... that's the buzz!

The Art Buzz

The Art Buzz: July 2017

Still Hungry?

Still Hungry? July 2017: Recipes from The Teahouse
This month in Local Flavor: A Revolution in the Arts, Evolution on the Table. This month's issue features stories on the highly influential George R. R. Martin, a world premier at Santa Fe Opera, The CCA and SITE Santa Fe, the timeless appeal of Georgia O'Keeffe, Clafoutis' new digs, The New Baking Company, Kaktus Brewing, and Chef 2 Chef with Mark Kiffin. And of course, your usual favorites: The Buzz, Art Buzz, Still Hungry, Living in Epic Times & more! Read it here

 

Local Flavor is northern New Mexico’s complimentary food, wine and lifestyle magazine for Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Taos and Los Alamos. Local Flavor is read avidly by people living in northern New Mexico, as well as by thousands of visitors who travel to our area each year. Since 1994, Local Flavor has published stories about New Mexico chefs, restaurants, farmers, vintners, recipes and wine. In 2001, we added more flavors to the mix, and now include home decor, travel, design, arts and artisans, personal style, gardening, music and events. We offer visitors an insider’s look at local culture, area museums, galleries, restaurants and recreation—the best activities to experience and places to eat during a visit to New Mexico. We celebrate the deep historical roots of our community, the ethnic diversity of our people and the unique character of life in the high desert. We do this through in-depth stories on individuals who we feel embody these ideals. At its best, Local Flavor captures the essence of who we are.

June 2017 Fishing Report – Eagle Nest Lake

With runoff still affecting our free running streams, it’s time to head lakeside. Conveniently, still water generally fishes best in spring and early summer anyway. The high alpine lakes will be accessible until July but Eagle Nest Lake can be driven right up to. It is nestled at 9000’ in the Moreno Valley—a half hour east of Taos. It’s a great place to view wildlife––eagles, white pelicans, thousands of ducks and geese––and early in the morning elk can be seen on the Eastern shores.

This is a much larger lake then it seems—perhaps because its dwarfed under the state’s highest mountains. Historically, it’s a productive trout lake but fishing has taken a downturn in recent years. We could blame global warming in general for the lake’s decline. The water turns green later in midsummer from algae and aquatic insect activity has lessened. And there are other factors too, the addition of yellow perch and then pike a few years ago have not helped the trout fishery. (The perch were mistakenly added twenty-five years ago, but it’s not known how the pike got in there.) Perhaps of greater importance is the burgeoning population of carp that has developed in the last decade. This once great fishery needs to be treated with a pesticide and have a total make-over. This is unlikely however, as the state of New Mexico Game and Fish lacks the money and motivation to do this. (Such massive projects are done in Colorado and Montana.) Continue reading

A Tale of Two Bakeries

If you suddenly find yourself hungry when you’re in the south end of Santa Fe’s South Capitol district, there’s a good reason for it. That fragrant aroma of baking baguettes, croissants, pastries, muffins and more wafting through the air comes from two beloved Santa Fe restaurants that are new to…

The Force of George RR Martin

george-r-r-martin

Back in 1979, when George R.R. Martin first arrived in Santa Fe, both he and his newly adopted city were relative unknowns outside of their respective genres: GRRM’s fantasy, horror and sci-fi; Santa Fe’s the visual arts market. But for this already-successful writer of novels and TV shows, the world…

Chef 2 Chef with Mark Kiffin

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The process and mechanism of an interview is a delicious little tidbit that stands on its own. While it’s not quite a profile, it is an intimate reveal, a portrait of both interviewer and interviewee. No two minds perform the same, thus, what I think is an interesting question to…

The Buzz- July 2017

Albuquerque Get plowed in Four Hills! Because soon, Tractor Brewing Company—they of the “get plowed” tagline—will be opening a third taproom at Central Avenue and Tramway Boulevard. The new spot will feature a large patio and 24 craft beer and cider selections. “This is an amazing opportunity to open a…

Art Buzz – July 2017

Albuquerque Arts and culture in Downtown Albuquerque notched a big win Wednesday, with the announcement of more than $100,000 in grant funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. The City of Albuquerque’s Public Art Urban Enhancement Division, Downtown Arts & Cultural District, and a group of 10 local organizations…

Romero Farms

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Matt is one of the most popular, colorful vendors at the market, offering samples, recipe ideas, growing tips and answers to just about any question a shopper may have. He is what you might call “a farmer’s farmer”—skilled at his craft, devoted to his labor and happy to share what…

The Corn Man

Taos Family Foods

Have you ever counted the kernels on a single cob of corn? Each seed is secured within a meandering row running the length of the cob. And sure, you could count each kernel, but knowing the number would not describe one cob of corn any better than simply knowing the…

Think New Mexico

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Amidst the political slings and arrows of this particularly acrimonious year, a modest historical residence perches, facing the Roundhouse, as it has for almost 20 years–quietly percolating. It’s a unique kind of think tank. Inside, the small staff—with guidance from its board of directors—births ingenious possibilities buttressed with persistent, meticulous…