Now, That’s Italian: Best Italian Wines

With over 350 authorized grape varieties and roughly 500 additional grape types found in Italy, the country is an incredible trove of variety. Such diversity needs explaining, especially in wine. From north to south, from Nebbiolo to Nero d’Avola, the country, withits cuisine and wine, is amazing for its breadth...

Destination: Corrales

As soon as you pass the sign welcoming you to Corrales, it’s clear that you’re some place special. The village of Corrales, a laidback town of about 8,500 people just northwest of Albuquerque, is an idyllic sliver of time. Horses graze in pastures; trees grace the sides of the road;...

Let’s Grab a Beer August 2015: Summer Suds

Summer: It’s a beer drinkers’ season if ever there was one. I mean, no one heads out to the lake with a cooler full of wine! No one rewards themselves for an afternoon of yardwork by enjoying a shot of bourbon! And when it comes to firing up the grill,...

The Rail Yards Market in Albuquerque

The industrial neighborhoods of Albuquerque’s South Valley have always fascinated me. The gritty work, real tangible stuff, happens here. Fleets of trucks are maintained; pipe and fittings for the oil and gas industry are fabricated; there are welding shops, millwork shops and lumberyards. Residential neighborhoods are pocketed among the blocks...

The Book, the Chef, His Wife and their Cover: The Restaurant Martin Cookbook

As in a Western epic where partners join shoulder-to-shoulder to ride out together, local heroes Chef Martin Rios, Jennifer Rios, Bill Jamison, Cheryl Alters Jamison and photographer Kate Russell, banded together to create The Restaurant Martín Cookbook: Sophisticated Home Cooking From the Celebrated Santa Fe Restaurant (Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers)....

The Buzz August 2015

What's in, what's out, what's hot, what's not... that's the buzz!

The Art Buzz

The Art Buzz: August 2015

Still Hungry?

Still Hungry? Recipes from The Compound's Mark Kiffin
This month in Local Flavor: Weaving Legend Jill Scott Momaday, The New Restaurant Martin Cookbook, Railyard Markets in Albuquerque, Summer in Corrales, and Italian Wines. Plus your familiar favorites: The Buzz, Art Buzz, Still Hungry & more!

 

Local Flavor is northern New Mexico’s complimentary food, wine and lifestyle magazine for Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Taos and Los Alamos. Local Flavor is read avidly by people living in northern New Mexico, as well as by thousands of visitors who travel to our area each year. Since 1994, Local Flavor has published stories about New Mexico chefs, restaurants, farmers, vintners, recipes and wine. In 2001, we added more flavors to the mix, and now include home decor, travel, design, arts and artisans, personal style, gardening, music and events. We offer visitors an insider’s look at local culture, area museums, galleries, restaurants and recreation—the best activities to experience and places to eat during a visit to New Mexico. We celebrate the deep historical roots of our community, the ethnic diversity of our people and the unique character of life in the high desert. We do this through in-depth stories on individuals who we feel embody these ideals. At its best, Local Flavor captures the essence of who we are.

New Mexico Fly Fishing Report: Red River Update

An exceptionally wet spring has kept the Rio Grande and its primary tributary here-a-bouts, the Red River, high and muddy, making neither river fishable. So, instead, here’s my long-range fishing forecast––a forecast that contains a lot of promise for the future of this important water.

The Lower Red is critical to the health of the Rio Grande but has been severely degraded by the Questa mine for decades. Within the last few years however, it has been able to sustain large wild trout again. (See “Down on the Red”—a story in Taylor’s book, Man vs Fish). That story highlights what was a stupendous trout fishing back some 40 years ago––and its ensuing demise. I became involved with work for the Red back then; but to little avail as the price of moly (Molybdenum) kept the mine operating. But the Questa mine is gone for good now and repairs to the environment are underway.

The Red River Habitat Improvement Project will soon be finished and anglers will be catching trout in the newly improved river’s habitat. And I’m doubly proud of this great project because my son Nick––and our friends Garrett VeneKlasen of New Mexico Wildlife Federation and Toner Mitchel of Trout Unlimited––were instrumental in making it happen.

First let’s look at the project starting just upstream of Questa. There, the Red River had been reduced to nothing but a channelized ditch. But heavy machinery has now widened the stream channel where large rocks, tree stumps and logs have been placed in strategic positions––not only to add holding water for trout, but also to encourage the river to meander naturally again. Footbridges have been installed for easier access by fishermen, and a trail now runs along the stream.

The Chevron Mine did their dredging in an area adjoining Eagle Rock Lake. The lake had filled with sediment and mine tailings over the years, and fishing there had been on the decline. Between the remodeling of river and lake, The Eagle Rock area will be a fantastic fishing destination—and a great boon to the struggling town of Questa.

A second project area is downstream a few miles, on the Red, at Red River State Fish Hatchery. Despite its physical proximity to the fish factory this is an important fishery in itself as warm spring water from the hatchery attract trout year-round, except there has been no place for them to hang in this long and shallow stretch of stream. But the Questa Economic Board, TU and the New Mexico Game and Fish have enhanced the river with large boulders to create deep pools and pockets. This is a very popular place for all to fish and anglers to sack up trout. They are usually stocked fish but unfortunately wild spawning browns are also harvested. Such trout should be protected somehow.

One step towards wild trout protection and reproduction is in the removal of an old diversion dam upstream of the hatchery. The dam was acting as a fish barrier and wild brown and rainbow trout should now be able to repopulate from the fertile Rio Grande—just a few miles away.

To benefit the Red River Project, the Enchanted Circle and Truchas Chapters of Trout Unlimited will be co-hosting a fundraising tournament this fall, October 17 and 18. The tournament will be a beginner- friendly, guided event, in which teams of three anglers and one guide will fish a day on the Rio Grande and the other day on the Red River. Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place will be awarded as well as biggest and smallest fish. This will be the third year that TU has put on the event and we expect it to be a grand time. To get more information on the tournament, go to www.ec-tu.org.

Report from Taylor Streit

Now, That’s Italian: Best Italian Wines

wine test - man holding glass

With over 350 authorized grape varieties and roughly 500 additional grape types found in Italy, the country is an incredible trove of variety. Such diversity needs explaining, especially in wine. From north to south, from Nebbiolo to Nero d’Avola, the country, withits cuisine and wine, is amazing for its breadth…

The Rail Yards Market in Albuquerque

DSC_4163

The industrial neighborhoods of Albuquerque’s South Valley have always fascinated me. The gritty work, real tangible stuff, happens here. Fleets of trucks are maintained; pipe and fittings for the oil and gas industry are fabricated; there are welding shops, millwork shops and lumberyards. Residential neighborhoods are pocketed among the blocks…

Jill Scott Momaday

Jill-Momaday-RainyMountain

For two years in the early ’90s, Jill Scott Momaday drove one day a week to Jemez Springs to visit her Grandmother Natachee. “I’d bring a bag of groceries, a nice bottle of red wine, and it would be just me. We’d sit all day, telling stories.” She stares inside,…