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Web Exclusive: Four More Winter Cocktails

Kentucky Bramble From Quinn Stephenson, Coyote Café and Geronimo Restaurant   ¾ ounce lemon juice 2 ounces Basil Hayden bourbon 4 large blackberries ½ ounce allspice dram 1 ounce crème de mure garnish: blackberry coated with powdered sugar  

Jambo’s Ahmed Obo

One of the first things anyone notices about Chef Ahmed Obo is his smile: it’s warm, sincere and frequent. His beaming goes beyond charm and optimism, however. It reflects his heartfelt desire to give of himself: everything and anything he can.

We Asked the Mayor

Thanksgiving’s approach brings with it a cornucopia of memories and associations, especially those related to delicious smells wafting from the kitchen. It’s traditionally a time of gathering together with people we love, sharing with them our special ritual foods and getting the chance to rediscover, if we’re lucky, how much...

Cheesemongers of Santa Fe

The small adobe building on East Marcy Street, previously home to an office space filled with cubicles, now houses the very last thing you might expect and something you’ll be delighted to discover: several enormous deli cases soon to be filled with more cheeses than you can name. I’m surprised...
What's in, what's out, what's hot, what's not... that's the buzz

The Art Buzz

The Art Buzz: November 2014

Festival of the Cranes

Our November Local Favorite: The Festival of the Cranes
This month in Local Flavor: Our November "Giving Thanks" issue features Jambo's Ahmed Obo, interviews with the mayors of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, cocktails for cold weather, recipes from mom, and the Cheesemongers of Santa Fe.

 

Local Flavor is northern New Mexico’s complimentary food, wine and lifestyle magazine for Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Taos and Los Alamos. Local Flavor is read avidly by people living in northern New Mexico, as well as by thousands of visitors who travel to our area each year. Since 1994, Local Flavor has published stories about New Mexico chefs, restaurants, farmers, vintners, recipes and wine. In 2001, we added more flavors to the mix, and now include home decor, travel, design, arts and artisans, personal style, gardening, music and events. We offer visitors an insider’s look at local culture, area museums, galleries, restaurants and recreation—the best activities to experience and places to eat during a visit to New Mexico. We celebrate the deep historical roots of our community, the ethnic diversity of our people and the unique character of life in the high desert. We do this through in-depth stories on individuals who we feel embody these ideals. At its best, Local Flavor captures the essence of who we are.

We Asked the Mayor

Mayor Gonzales Photo: Maria Clokey, City of Santa Fe

Mayor Gonzales
Photo: Maria Clokey, City of Santa Fe

Thanksgiving’s approach brings with it a cornucopia of memories and associations, especially those related to delicious smells wafting from the kitchen. It’s traditionally a time of gathering together with people we love, sharing with them our special ritual foods and getting the chance to rediscover, if we’re lucky, how much these people and places dear to our hearts really mean to us, even with their quirks (maybe even because of their quirks!). Continue reading

Cheesemongers of Santa Fe

The small adobe building on East Marcy Street, previously home to an office space filled with cubicles, now houses the very last thing you might expect and something you’ll be delighted to discover: several enormous deli cases soon to be filled with more cheeses than you can name. I’m surprised by the large, open room, saturated with sunlight from rows of windows and skylights that cast reflections off the glass case fronts and light up the pale mint-colored counters. When I arrive to meet John Gutierrez, one of the partners behind Cheesemongers of Santa Fe, he’s moving from case to counter and back again, grabbing different cheeses and expertly slicing them into an array of shapes.

Photo by Gabriella Marks

Photo by Gabriella Marks

Continue reading

Art Buzz November 2014

Art Buzz

Albuquerque

Friday, November 21, is the Citywide Artscrawl and Holiday Kickoff, with five percent of sales of participating galleries going to charity. Of note is New Grounds Print Workshop & Gallery’s Hot Off the Press—Open Studio, Fundraiser and Printing Extravaganza with seven artists pulling prints: etchings, gravure, linoleum cuts and serigraphs, available for sale at a discount during the reception only. Participating artists include Diane Alire, Ray Maseman, local treasure Mary Sundstrom, Kaitlin Reese, Wayne Chinander, Nikolaus Hudak and Ren Adams. Visit newgroundsgallery.com for details. Continue reading

The Buzz November 2014

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If there are three things Duke City dwellers love, it’s chile, beer and coffee. Travel & Leisure magazine recently ranked Albuquerque number four on its list of cities known for coffee. The magazine cited the New Mexico Piñon Coffee Company’s blend made with piñon and the coffee milkshake from Golden Crown Panaderia. With a double shot of espresso, that milkshake is sure to keep you up nights! Head there, or to one of our other favorites like Michael Thomas (with two locations now!), Zendo, or Daily Grind and find out what makes our humble burg special coffee-wise. Continue reading

Celebrating the Cranes

2013 Festival of the Cranes Photo Contest 1st place winner in the category of Refuge Wildlife or Scenery, Jack Panzeca

2013 Festival of the Cranes Photo Contest 1st place winner in the category of Refuge Wildlife or Scenery, Jack Panzeca

Something deep inside of me connects with this elemental life, tears well in my eyes, my heart pounds, I have never seen anything like this. The force to migrate, the desire for winter shelter are as constant as our days and the changing of the seasons. It wasn’t so long ago we humans did much the same; a little bit of the pull is still in us. Continue reading

Get Out the Hard Stuff!

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Everywhere I look, trees have thrown off their colorful robes. Crackly piles of yellow leaves lie everywhere, piling up in corners and covering the ground between tree trunks. The afternoons, ever shorter, have a wonderful crisp feel and most days I can smell piñon and cedar fires burning in nearby kivas. Wool sweaters and hats are being pulled down from the top shelves of closets and we’ve all got our eyes on the Santa Fe ski basin, waiting for snow. It’s here: winter has crept up on us. I’ve traded in my salad bowl for the Crock-Pot and likewise it’s time to retire mojitos and mint juleps in favor of darker spirits and warming winter cocktails. I asked some of northern New Mexico’s most talented bartenders for their favorite cold-weather creations. Their original recipes and twists on old classics will have you feeling warm and fuzzy through the holidays and beyond. Continue reading

Chef Perno’s French Green Lentil Salad with Winter Squash

PernoBoys2

Chef Jonathan Perno grew up in New Mexico in a household that had a “lot of traditional New Mexico food, especially around the holidays.” Meals were always at the table and the food was the focal point. “We were always excited when she made cakes,” Chef Jonathan says of his mother. He and his brothers would crowd into the kitchen to see who got the beaters, the spoon and the bowl to lick clean. Continue reading

Chef Muller’s Mom’s Fried Chicken

Ask Chef Fred Muller for a recipe from his mother’s kitchen and he doesn’t hesitate a second. Fried chicken. “I’m from the South,” he says. “Fried chicken is served at any family event.” Fred started helping out in the kitchen for selfish reasons; he was always starving and he thought that if he helped out, dinner would appear that much faster. One of his earliest tasks was to be in charge of putting the chicken in a brown paper bag and shaking it to coat it with the seasoning. Fred warns not to be discouraged if your fried chicken is not perfect on your first try. It takes a little practice, but the end results are well worth it. Continue reading

Calabacitas Con Carne

AutumnSquash

By Photo by M.Rehemtulla [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

From Arlene Wagner of Wagner Farms

1 1/2 pounds beef steak, cubed
2 Tablespoons shortening1/2 cup water
2 cups fresh corn cut from cob
3 medium zuchini, diced
2 medium summer squash, diced
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 cup chopped green chile
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup grated Monterrey Jack cheese

Brown beef in shortening in a large skillet at medium-high heat. Lower heat and add water to beef. Cover and simmer at low heat until tender. Add more water if needed. Add remaining ingredients, except cheese, to beef and cook at medium heat until squash is tender. Add cheese, stir lightly and enjoy!

Wagner Farms is located at 5000 Corrales Road in Corrales. 505.459.0719, wagnerfarmscorrales.com.

Hearts a’ Fire

Photo courtesy Dick Rice

Photo courtesy Dick Rice

Like most other boys growing up in Terre Haute, Ind., Dick Rice’s head was filled with dreams and ideas, but they didn’t include flying his own hot air balloon. Outside of Jules Verne and “The Wizard of Oz,” ballooning wasn’t a real life concept to most kids in those days. Dick’s path to ballooning was much more of a long, strange—and grounded—trip, involving four years of college to become a certified public accountant and, after graduation, a job in the tax department of a firm in Chicago. Continue reading

Gruet

When I walk through the front door of Gruet Winery in Albuquerque, I’m hit with the wonderful smells of wine production: the sweet, fragrant aroma of freshly pressed grapes and the earthy smell of oak barrels. I can hear the gentle, high-pitched clinking of bottles as they move through the bottling line. Laurent Gruet, the son of founder Gilbert Gruet and the company’s winemaker, shows me around the winery.

Gruet by Gabriella Marks

Photo by Gabriella Marks

There are several containers of fresh Chardonnay grapes just in from the vineyard waiting to be pressed. Nearby, a giant hydraulic grape press reaches nearly to the warehouse ceiling. Rows of tanks, the largest of which can hold 60,000 bottles of wine, fill one room. Workers scurry across the wet concrete floor busy with various tasks. Bottles ready to be sold move like little soldiers through the bottling line. Each bottle is disgorged, topped up, corked, labeled and prepared for sale—a thousand cases per day. It’s a beautiful, circular process that symbolizes how far Gruet has come in 25 years. I sat down with Laurent to talk about the history and future of Gruet, and to find out what the future may hold for the wine industry in the Land of Enchantment. Continue reading